Tag: memory

Memcached PHP Applications for Faster Web Apps

Caching is some sort of indispensable feature of most affordable application hosting and swift, low-latency user experiences. In-memory caching is one connected with the most widely put to use techniques, and Memcached’s in-memory caching capabilities

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How to Use PHP-FPM with cPanel

PHP performance is an enduring issue for web hosts. PHP is the most widely used server programming language on the web by a big margin. The most popular content management systems and ecommerce applications are

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Disk IO Errors: Troubleshooting on Linux Servers

Disk IO errors  (input/output) issues are a common cause of poor performance on web hosting servers. Hard drives have speed limits, and if software tries to read or write too much data too quickly, applications

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Server Housekeeping with cPanel

Servers are your virtual home and, just like your real home, they can become cluttered with unwanted junk.  In the case of servers, it’s not trash but data you have to kick to the curb

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Troubleshooting High Server Loads

One of the more ambiguous, but oft-seen, errors resulting in support tickets is related to high server loads. While high server load errors are virtually never caused by the cPanel software itself or the apps it installs, these errors can

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How To Survive a DDoS Attack

Distributed Denial of Services (DDoS) attacks can take any website offline. Even Google and GitHub, with their immense resources, struggle to stay online during a large attack. Even worse, anyone with a few dollars can

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3 Apps to Optimize Your Server Performance

Server performance isn’t just an issue for hosting providers, it’s a big deal for web admins, and most of all, for the person staring into a blank browser window, waiting for a page to load.

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Dealing with InnoDB Corruption – Common Misconceptions

InnoDB, given its (relatively) recent change as the default engine of MySQL, can quickly take an unfamiliar administrator off-guard if they’re not aware of the way that InnoDB works behind the scenes. With that in

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